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Ikogosi Warm Springs

Ikogosi Warm Springs

This warm spring runs down a hilly landscape where it forms a confluence with another cold spring from an adjoining hill and merges into one continuous stream. The evergreen tall trees which surround the spring provide the canopy under which visitors relax. The people of Ikogosi worship the goddess of the water and have strong belief in the myth around it. The undulating landscape adds natural beauty to the scenery. it is located in Ekiti State.

The Ikogosi Warm Springs is a tourist attraction located at Ikogosi, a town in Ekiti State, southwestern Nigeria. Flowing abreast the warm spring is another cold spring which meets the warm spring at a confluence, each maintaining its thermal properties. These attributes make the spring a tourist attraction in Nigeria. Research suggested that the warm spring has a temperature of about 70oC at the source and 37oC at the confluence.

In 1952, Southern Baptist missionary, Rev. John S. McGee, from his mission base in the nearby Ekiti town of Igede, went to the source of the hot and cold springs, about which he had heard from the Ikogosi people. Initially, he was discouraged from doing this, for reasons of the tradition he had heard from the local residents, which was that nobody should ever visit the source of these two streams, because of the idea that to do so would be to invite death from the supernatural forces that were responsible for this strange, and most unusual, feature of nature. In spite of these "warnings," Rev. McGee made his way through the bush/forest, up the hill to the source of the two side-by-side springs. According to Rev. McGee's later brief, written account, "After seeing it, I felt that it could be used for a good purpose. I discussed the possible use of it with some of the Mission and (Nigerian Baptist) Convention friends. With the growing interest of Royal Ambassador work, and youth work, we felt that it could best be used by building a Youth Camp. I took it up with the Ekiti Association and we decided to build a camp for our R.A.s and G.A.s. The land was secured through the Convention."